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Wonderful Whole Grain Bread Recipe

December 20, 2011 - Some time back, I promised to publish my recipe for whole grain bread.  I just took a look at Transition Voice's website, and - lo and behold - Lindsay has published her recipe for Butternut Squash soup.  It looks fabulous, and would be beyond amazing with my whole grain bread.  For those of you with the ambition and the time - enjoy!

1 3/4 c. all-purpose flour
2 c. whole wheat flour
1 c. oatmeal
1/4 c. sunflower seeds
Add a sprinkling of flax seed if you care to
2 pkgs. yeast
1 T. sugar
1 1/2 c. scalded milk
4 T. butter
1 t. salt
1 c. brown sugar

Combine yeast with 1/4 - 1/2 c. warm water and 1 T. sugar.  Combine milk, brown sugar, butter and salt.  When lukewarm, mix with yeast, flours, oatmeal and seeds.

Knead dough, and allow to rise for 2 hours.  Knead briefly again, divide between oiled bread pans, and allow to rise for 1 hour.

Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 375 and bake for another 40 minutes.

A Couple of Hints for Better Bread Baking:

If you know ahead of time that your brown sugar is as hard as a rock, do this: the night before, put your brown sugar in a bowl.  Cover the bowl with a very damp dish towel and let stand overnight.  Your brown sugar will be soft and crumbly the next day!

Never sure if your dough is in a warm enough place when it's rising?  Try this: preheat your oven to 350 degrees for one minute, then turn off.  Place dough in oven.  Works every time!

Be sure to add the sugar to your yeast.  It feeds the yeast and makes it more active.

Bon appetit!

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