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Play Time

Hi Everybody - My husband and I will be heading for the Pacific Northwest for a couple of weeks, and during that time I won't be posting. Pay attention to your favorite financial/economic blogs (Max Keiser, Economic Collapse, Zero Hedge)- there's trouble ahead, especially in Europe.
Be well, and take care of each other.

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